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Ireland Non Dom Rules: Things Investor Should Know in 2023

Ireland non dom rules

The world of finance often throws around terms that may seem confusing to the uninitiated. One such term, especially in the context of Ireland, is “Non Dom”. But what does “Non Dom” mean?

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This article isn’t formal tax advice.

Table of Contents

What does “Non Dom” mean?

When we talk about “Non Dom”, we refer to individuals who live in Ireland but don’t consider it their permanent home. This distinction between domicile and residence plays a crucial role in how Ireland taxes these individuals.

Ireland non dom rules have evolved over time, with a rich historical context that shapes their current form.

Ireland non dom rules have their roots in the country’s efforts to attract foreign investment and skilled professionals.

Over the years, these rules have undergone several changes, but their core principle remains: offering tax advantages to those who choose to live in Ireland without making it their permanent home.

Origins of the Non Dom Regime

Ireland’s non-domicile regime traces its origins back to 1799, introduced by UK prime minister William Pitt the Younger. This regime was not altered even after Ireland gained its independence. Pitt, known for the Act of Union of 1800 and his efforts to emancipate Catholics, also spearheaded Britain’s war efforts against Napoleon.

To fund these wars, Britain introduced its first income tax. The non-domicile regime was established alongside this tax, allowing those with foreign property to protect it from wartime taxes.

Ireland non dom rules
The Ireland non dom rules are designed to protect the assets of non-domiciled individuals.

Modern Implications and Changes

Today, the Ireland non dom rules allow individuals who reside in Ireland but have their domicile in another country to only pay Irish tax on their Irish incomes.

To claim non-domiciled status, one typically needs to have a father or grandfather who resided in another country at the time of their birth. However, there are exceptions.

For instance, HSBC’s chief executive, Stuart Gulliver, despite being born and raised in the UK, considers Hong Kong his home and thus claims non-dom status.

In 2014, a significant change was introduced in the UK, where a £90,000 charge was levied on non-doms who had lived in the UK for 17 of the past 20 years.

Similarly, in Ireland, to claim non-dom status, one must satisfy a domicile test, which is based on where the law considers a person’s home to be. This can be due to having a non-Irish parent or by electing a “domicile of choice” based on business interests or bank accounts in a specific location.

Taxation and Exemptions

The primary benefit of the Ireland non dom rules is that an individual only pays Irish tax on income and gains made within the country. Foreign income gets taxed elsewhere unless brought into Ireland.

However, this exemption only applies to investment income. Following a scandal in 2006 involving the Turkish construction group Gama, the rules were amended to exclude employment income.

Potential Challenges and Considerations

One potential challenge that could arise if the UK abolished its non-dom regime and these individuals moved to Ireland is the exposure to Capital Acquisitions Tax (CAT), which applies to gifts and inheritances.

Typically, CAT doesn’t apply to someone who isn’t domiciled unless they were tax resident in Ireland for the five tax years preceding the year the gift or inheritance was received.

Benefits of the Ireland Non Dom Rules

Ireland non dom rules offer a plethora of benefits to those who qualify. Let’s delve deeper into these advantages.

Ireland non dom rules 5
If you gain employment with an Irish company, you will automatically be included in the Irish income tax system known as the PAYE system.

Tax advantages for non-domiciled individuals

One of the primary attractions of the Ireland non dom rules is the favorable tax treatment. Non-domiciled individuals only pay tax on the income they bring into Ireland, known as the remittance basis of taxation.

Additionally, several exemptions and reliefs further reduce the tax burden, making Ireland an attractive destination for many.

Specific Tax Benefits for Non-Doms in Ireland

As an individual with non-domiciled status in Ireland, you are only taxable on Irish sources of income.

Income from foreign sources is only taxable to the extent that it is remitted (brought into) to Ireland.

Remittances of capital funds, including income earned when an individual was resident outside of Ireland, are not subject to Irish income tax.

For those who use their wealth accumulated outside of Ireland to cover their day-to-day living expenses, it’s possible to live in Ireland tax-free.

Individuals with non-domiciled status who are resident or ordinarily resident in Ireland are liable to Irish capital gains tax only on gains arising on the disposal of assets situated in Ireland or the United Kingdom. All other foreign gains are taxable only if they are remitted to Ireland.

Asset protection and estate planning benefits

Beyond taxation, Ireland non dom rules also provide robust asset protection mechanisms. These rules ensure that non-domiciled individuals can safeguard their global assets more effectively, offering peace of mind and financial security.

Safeguarding Global Assets

The Ireland non dom rules are designed to protect the assets of non-domiciled individuals. By allowing non-doms to only pay tax on the income they bring into Ireland, these rules ensure that their foreign income remains untouched. This is especially beneficial for those who have significant assets or income sources outside of Ireland.

Estate Planning Considerations

Estate planning is a crucial aspect for non-domiciled individuals. The Ireland non dom rules offer advantages in this area as well. For instance, Capital Acquisitions Tax (CAT) in Ireland applies to gifts and inheritances.

Typically, CAT doesn’t apply to someone who isn’t domiciled unless they were tax resident in Ireland for the five tax years preceding the year the gift or inheritance was received. This provision allows non-doms to plan their estates more effectively, ensuring that their heirs receive the maximum benefits.

3. Determining Your Non Dom Status

Understanding whether you qualify under the Ireland non dom rules is crucial. Here’s how you can determine your status.

Criteria for non-domiciled status in Ireland

To benefit from the Ireland non dom rules, you must meet specific criteria. Primarily, while you might reside in Ireland, you shouldn’t view it as your forever home. Factors like your length of stay and connections to other countries also come into play.

Residence and Ordinary Residence

The criteria used to determine an individual’s liability to Irish tax are his residence, ordinary residence, and domicile status.

An individual is treated as being resident in Ireland if, in the tax year from 1 January to 31 December, they are physically present in Ireland for 183 days or more.

Alternatively, if they spend a combined total of 280 days or more in Ireland in both the current and preceding tax years. However, they will not be treated as residents under this test for any tax year during which they spend 30 days or less in Ireland.

An individual is regarded as ordinarily resident in Ireland for a tax year if they have been an Irish resident for each of the three preceding tax years. Once they become ordinarily resident in Ireland, they do not cease to be ordinarily resident for a tax year unless they have been non-resident in Ireland for each of the preceding three tax years.

Ireland non dom rules
The Ireland non dom rules are designed to ensure that non-domiciled individuals pay the appropriate amount of tax on their worldwide income.

Domicile

Domicile is a complex term not defined in the Irish tax code. It’s primarily a question of fact, based on the notion of an individual’s permanent home to which that person intends ultimately to return.

A person can be considered domiciled in the country which is the individual’s permanent home, even if they are temporarily resident in another country. An individual can never be without domicile.

Generally, an individual is domiciled in the country of nationality and in which the greater part of the person’s life is spent, known as the domicile of origin.

Once an individual reaches the age of majority, the ‘domicile of origin’ can be abandoned, and a ‘domicile of choice’ can be acquired. In this situation, factors of presence and intention would be required.

Common misconceptions about achieving non dom status

Many believe that merely living in Ireland for a certain number of years guarantees non dom status.

However, Ireland non dom rules require more than just a prolonged stay. Your intentions and ties to other nations play a significant role.

Misunderstanding the Remittance Basis of Taxation

Non-Irish domiciled individuals who are Irish tax resident for a year of assessment will be liable to Irish income tax on Irish source income and on foreign income to the extent that the funds are remitted to Ireland.

This is known as the Remittance Basis of Taxation. It’s a common misconception that all foreign income is exempt from taxation in Ireland.

In reality, only remuneration derived from a non-Irish employment to the extent that duties of the employment are performed outside of Ireland and non-Irish investment income and gains may potentially fall outside of the Irish charge to tax.

Misconceptions about PAYE Exclusion Order

A PAYE Exclusion Order may be issued for non-resident employees of Irish ‘private sector’ employers. This order is applicable where an individual is in receipt of Irish source ‘private sector’ employment income and is not resident in the State for tax purposes for the relevant tax year.

However, the duties of the employment must be exercised wholly outside the State. Many people mistakenly believe that any non-resident can easily obtain this order, but in reality, the criteria are strict, and incidental duties performed in the State may be ignored only if they amount to fewer than 30 days working in Ireland over a full tax year.

4. Tax Implications for Ireland’s Non Doms

Navigating the tax landscape under the Ireland non dom rules requires careful attention. Understanding the nuances can help individuals optimize their tax situation and avoid potential pitfalls.

Income generated within Ireland

Under the Ireland non dom rules, all income you earn within the country faces taxation. This includes salaries, rental income, and any other local earnings.

If you gain employment with an Irish company, you will automatically be included in the Irish income tax system known as the PAYE system (pay as you earn). Otherwise, you must file an annual tax return before October 31st.

Foreign-sourced income and gains

Things get interesting when we discuss foreign income. Ireland non dom rules tax foreign income based on the remittance basis. This means you only pay tax on the money you bring into Ireland. However, pitfalls exist, and making common mistakes can prove costly.

Remittance Basis of Taxation

Ireland’s non-dom tax system operates on a Remittance basis. This means non-doms are taxed only on Irish source income or foreign income that they move from abroad into Ireland.

For instance, if you earn money abroad and keep it outside of Ireland, you won’t be taxed on it. But if you bring that money into Ireland, it becomes taxable.

Examples of remittances include using foreign funds to make purchases in Ireland, using a foreign credit card in Ireland, or depositing foreign income in an Irish bank account.

Exceptions to the Remittance Rule

While the remittance basis is a significant advantage of the Ireland non dom rules, there are exceptions.

For instance, certain types of income, like employment income, might still be subject to Irish tax even if not remitted. It’s crucial to be aware of these exceptions to avoid unexpected tax liabilities.

Benefits of Being a Non-Dom in Ireland

If you are a resident of Ireland but not Irish-domiciled, you are liable to pay tax on all income and gains which arise from inside the Republic of Ireland.

However, Ireland will not tax your foreign income or any gains made from foreign sources unless that money is remitted to Ireland. This remittance basis of taxation can offer significant tax advantages for those with substantial foreign income.

Potential Pitfalls and Considerations

While the Ireland non dom rules offer many benefits, they also come with potential pitfalls. For instance, if you mistakenly remit foreign income to Ireland, you could face unexpected tax liabilities.

Additionally, the rules around what constitutes a remittance can be complex, especially when dealing with assets or investments. It’s essential to seek expert advice to navigate these rules effectively.

Tax Residency and Domicile in Ireland

The two main factors determining your tax situation in Ireland are your tax residency and your domicile.

To be deemed a tax resident in Ireland, you must physically reside in the country for 183 days of the tax year.

Alternatively, you become a tax resident if you have spent a total of 280 days or more in the country during the current and preceding tax years.

Domicile, on the other hand, is a more complex concept based on where you consider your permanent home.

5. Reporting and Compliance for Non Doms

Staying compliant with Ireland non dom rules is paramount. The Ireland non dom rules are designed to ensure that non-domiciled individuals pay the appropriate amount of tax on their worldwide income. These rules are intricate, and understanding them is crucial for anyone who falls under this category.

Annual tax return requirements

Every year, non-domiciled individuals must file their tax returns in Ireland. This is a fundamental aspect of the Ireland non dom rules. Key dates and deadlines exist, ensuring that the tax system runs smoothly and efficiently.

Ireland non dom rules
If you are a resident of Ireland but not Irish-domiciled, you are liable to pay tax on all income and gains which arise from inside the Republic of Ireland.

Documentation and Records

Under the Ireland non dom rules, it’s essential to provide specific documentation and records to support your claims. This might include proof of foreign income, evidence of tax paid in other jurisdictions, and any other relevant financial records.

Keeping meticulous records is not just a recommendation; it’s a requirement. The Revenue Commissioners in Ireland will need to see these documents if they decide to review your tax return.

Key Dates and Deadlines

The Ireland non dom rules stipulate that the tax year in Ireland runs from January 1st to December 31st.

The deadline for paper tax returns is usually the 31st of October of the following year. However, if you file online, you might get an extended deadline, typically into mid-November.

It’s crucial to mark these dates in your calendar and ensure you file your returns on time to avoid penalties.

Penalties for non-compliance

Failing to adhere to the Ireland non dom rules can result in severe penalties. It’s essential to stay informed and ensure you meet all requirements.

Financial Penalties

The Ireland non dom rules are clear about the consequences of non-compliance. If you fail to file your tax return on time or provide inaccurate information, you could face significant financial penalties. The exact amount will depend on the nature and severity of the breach.

Additional Consequences

Beyond financial penalties, non-compliance with the Ireland non dom rules can lead to other consequences. This might include audits, investigations, and in severe cases, legal action. It’s crucial to understand the potential repercussions and take the necessary steps to remain compliant.

6. Changes and Updates to Ireland’s Non Dom Rules

Like all tax laws, Ireland non dom rules aren’t static. They evolve, reflecting the changing economic landscape and the country’s strategic objectives.

Recent legislative changes and their impact

In recent years, we’ve seen tweaks to the Ireland non dom rules. These changes aim to streamline the process, offer clarity, and ensure fairness in taxation.

The Remittance Basis of Taxation

One of the most significant aspects of the Ireland non dom rules is the remittance basis of taxation. This means that non-domiciled individuals are taxed in Ireland on foreign source income only to the extent they remit it to Ireland. This approach is similar to the UK’s system, but crucially, Ireland doesn’t levy a remittance charge, and its rules are less burdensome.

Bringing Money into Ireland and Tax Implications

Typically, under the Ireland non dom rules, you should only be taxed on the money you bring into Ireland for daily living expenses, such as rent, food, and travel. This approach provides flexibility for non-doms, allowing them to manage their tax exposure effectively.

Irish Residency Rules and Tax Implications

To be considered tax resident in Ireland, you need to spend 183 days or more in the country within a tax year. However, you can also gain Irish residency if you spend 280 days or more in Ireland over two consecutive tax years, considering the days spent during both years under the ‘look-back’ rule.

Taxation of Foreign Income in Ireland

While non-doms are liable for tax on Irish source income, they are only chargeable on foreign income and gains if they remit them to Ireland. This distinction provides significant tax planning opportunities for non-doms.

Predicted future changes and trends

While predicting the future is tricky, we can anticipate further refinements to the Ireland non dom rules. Staying updated ensures you always remain compliant and benefit from any new provisions.

The Absence of ‘Deemed Domicile’ Rules

Unlike the UK, Ireland doesn’t have ‘deemed domicile’ rules. This means that a person can continue to use the remittance basis even if they’ve been resident in Ireland for several years, provided they don’t acquire an Irish domicile of choice.

Restricted Stock Options (RSU) and Non-Doms

For non-doms who are tax residents in Ireland, it’s possible to structure their RSUs in a way where they only pay tax on disposed RSUs that they remit to Ireland. This provision can lead to significant tax savings, especially for high earners.

Ireland non dom rules
You become a tax resident if you have spent a total of 280 days or more in the country during the current and preceding tax years.

Future Considerations for Non-Doms

As global tax landscapes evolve, Ireland may face pressure to modify its non dom rules, especially in light of international efforts to combat tax evasion and aggressive tax planning. Non-doms should keep a close eye on global tax trends and how they might influence Ireland’s stance in the future.

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Adam is an internationally recognised author on financial matters, with over 735.2 million answer views on Quora.com, a widely sold book on Amazon, and a contributor on Forbes.

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