16 Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe in 2022

16 Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe in 2022

In this article, we will discuss the cheapest cities to live in Europe among a wide array of picturesque and majestic options. In particular, we’ll look into the lesser-known undiscovered jewels of the continent.

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Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Kraków, Poland

One of the cheapest cities to live in Europe is Kraków, the second largest city in Poland. Although not as popular, it has a similar medieval appeal to Prague.

Kraków’s Main Market Square is the largest medieval square in Europe. The costs of lodging, meals, and attractions in Kraków are far lower than those in other major European cities. Plus, you won’t have to spend any money on public transit since Kraków is relatively walkable.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Kraków is estimated to cost 35 Polish zlotys (US$7.33) while a mid-range restaurant can charge 166 zlotys for a three-course meal for two, according to global cost of living data aggregator Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Kraków’s city center is at 18,036 zlotys, while that outside of the area is at 11,320 zlotys. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 2,752 zlotys and 2,252.5 zlotys on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Kraków for one person can hit 2,603 zlotys on average, while it can cost about 8,779 zlotys for a family of four, both excluding rent.

cheapest cities to live in europe krakow
Krakow, Poland. Image by teksomolika on Freepik  

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Český Krumlov, Czech Republic

One of the cheapest cities to live in Europe is Český Krumlov, which is only a few hours south of Prague. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site situated on a gorgeous river and features stunning Baroque and Renaissance buildings in every direction. A castle from the 13th century looms over the old town and provides sweeping vistas.

In contrast to the nearby cities, kingdoms, and empires that had been decimated by numerous battles, Český Krumlov had centuries of peace and stability, which helped to preserve its distinctive character and cultural history.

Cost of Living

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside Český Krumlov’s city center cost 10,000 Czech koruny (US$403) and 7,000 koruny on average per month, respectively.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Porto, Portugal

Portugal is home to the well-known coastal city of Porto. Although Porto is less urban and more off the beaten path, it is frequently compared to the capital of the nation, Lisbon.

Porto is one of the cheapest cities to live in Europe and is one of the most captivating and energetic towns in all of the western part of the continent.

Porto features a deep history, thriving nightlife, and famous port wine.

The Ponte de Dom Luis I and Cais da Ribeira, which span the Douro River, are two of Porto’s top attractions and are both free to visit.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Porto is estimated to cost 8 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 35 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within the city center is at 3,414 euros, while that outside of the area is at 1,903 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside Porto’s city center cost 720 euros and 557 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Porto for one person can hit 575 euros on average, while it can cost about 2,027 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Athens, Greece

Athens is like an outdoor museum dabbed with a millennia-long history. The oldest temples, statues, and monuments in the world may be found in the city, which serves as both the modern and ancient Greece’s capital.

The Acropolis, the Agora, and the Temple of Zeus are among of Athens’ most popular attractions. A number of historically notable structures, such as the Parthenon and the Temple of Athena Nike, can be found on the Acropolis, an ancient citadel perched atop a rocky outcrop. You can get sweeping views of the busy city below from the top of its ledge.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Athens is estimated to cost 12 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 50 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within the city center is at 2,430 euros, while that outside of the area is at 2,400 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside Athens’ city center cost 496 euros and 429 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Athens for one person can hit 753.5 euros on average, while it can cost about 2,542.5 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Budapest, Hungary

Thermal baths have been a popular attraction in Budapest, which is charmingly tucked away along the Danube River. It is one of the most romantic cities on this list.

The most delectable food in Central and Eastern Europe is said to come from this city. It’s good to note that Hungarian cuisine is extremely similar to Austrian cuisine, so you can still satisfy your cravings if you like Austrian food.

The Hungarian Parliament Building and Buda Castle will astound you if you’re a history and architecture enthusiast. These two famous and enormous structures guard the picturesque waterfront below.

The Fisherman’s Bastion is another highlight of Budapest. The stronghold resembles a Disney castle more than a structure created for tactical or strategic purposes. You will be able to see the Danube and the rest of the city from the top.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Budapest is estimated to cost 3,000 Hungarian forint (US$ 7.37), while a mid-range restaurant can charge 15,000 forint for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within the city center is at about 1.3 million forint, while that outside of the area is at 854,434 forint. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside Budapest’s city center cost 176,931 forint and 140,422.5 forint on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Budapest for one person can hit 222,551 forint on average, while it can cost about 770,195 forint for a family of four, both excluding rent.

cheapest cities to live in europe ljubljana
Szechenyi Chain Bridge in Budapest, Hungary. Image by wirestock on Freepik

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Ljubljana is a lovely – albeit relatively unnoticed – city that offers excellent value for your money.

The Slovenian capital is recognized for its sustainable tourism, as well as for being a green and hospitable city for pedestrian.

There are many different cultural attractions in Ljubljana, such as The Ljubljana Castle, Ljubljana Cathedral, and Triple Bridge in the Old Town. Ljubljana is also well-known for its hip eateries and coffee shops in addition to its environmental and cultural efforts.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Ljubljana is estimated to cost 10 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 40 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Ljubljana’s city center is at 4,292 euros, while that outside of the area is at 3,171 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 664 euros and 535 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Ljubljana for one person can hit 728 euros on average, while it can cost about 2,462 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Sevilla, Spain

Although Sevilla is typically much less expensive than Barcelona and Madrid, it still offers all the benefits of a large city with a vibrant culture. Sevilla, one of the largest cities in Spain, is one of the cheapest cities to live in Europe.

A wealth of historical and cultural landmarks can be found in Sevilla. The Real Alcázar of Sevilla, a royal palace with a mixed architecture, protrudes from this vast array of historically significant locations. The Alcázar also served as the shooting location for the fifth season of hit HBO series Game of Thrones.

Food and drink prices here are considerably lower than in other Spanish cities, like they are throughout most of Andalusia.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Sevilla is estimated to cost 10 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 42.5 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Sevilla’s city center is at 3,187.5 euros, while that outside of the area is at 1,971 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 646 euros and 444 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Sevilla for one person can hit 632 euros on average, while it can cost about 2,246 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Sofia, Bulgaria

Sofia is one the cheapest cities to live in Europe that has remained relatively undiscovered.

The city has a wide variety of distinctive sights, such as the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral that’s garbed with a huge gold dome. In addition, Sofia is a famous spot thanks to its food that’s comparable to those of Istanbul and other eastern European destinations.

Sofia is also packed with bars and clubs, just like other eastern European towns.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Sofia is estimated to cost 20 Bulgarian lev (US$10.15), while a mid-range restaurant can charge 70 lev  for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Sofia’s city center is at 4,634 lev, while that outside of the area is at 2,983 lev. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 818 lev and 613 lev on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Sofia for one person can hit 1,127 lev on average, while it can cost about 3,955 lev for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Valletta, Malta

Valletta, the capital of Malta, is home to many fascinating historical and cultural landmarks. It’s one of the cheapest cities to live in Europe and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

You’ll experience a sense of time travel as you stroll through Valletta, a miniature metropolis. Walls from the 1500s completely surround the city.

Here, you can enjoy the delicious Maltese food, the stunning Baroque architecture, and trips to the nearby fishing villages and historical places.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Valletta is estimated to cost 19 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 100 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Valletta’s city center is at 8,333 euros, while that outside of the area is at 5,900 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 970 euros and 781 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Valletta for one person can hit 953 euros on average, while it can cost about 3,431 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

cheapest cities to live in europe valletta
Valletta waterfront in Malta. Image by wirestock on Freepik

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Bologna, Italy

Bologna is well-known for its historical buildings with Renaissance influences, bustling piazzas, and rugged Old World character.

Bologna has kept its quaint and tranquil air, while the majority of tourists from abroad head for the crowded streets of Florence, Rome, and Venice. Bologna is surprisingly one of the cheapest cities to live in Europe.

One of the biggest and best-preserved medieval centers in all of Europe, it sprawls with life and buildings in soft hues. The Asinelli Tower, the tallest leaning tower in Italy, is also located in Bologna. It dwarfs the Leaning Tower of Pisa and tilts considerably as well.

Bologna has a vibrant music culture despite appearing to be a quiet city. Because of this, it is dubbed a Creative City of Music by UNESCO.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Bologna is estimated to cost 17.5 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 60 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Bologna’s city center is at 4,050 euros, while that outside of the area is at 2,812.5 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 735 euros and 558 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Bologna for one person can hit 825 euros on average, while it can cost about 2,894.5 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Bratislava, Slovakia

Slovakia’s capital city of Bratislava is a must-visit place. Even though Vienna is only an hour away by train, Bratislava has somehow avoided the throng up to this point. It currently ranks as one of the cheapest cities to live in Europe.

Bratislava is neither the largest nor the most opulent city, but it does have medieval allure and Gothic edge. There’s a lot to see when in Bratislava, such as fairy tale-looking buildings as well as gloomy structures that evoke the Communist era in Slovakia.

Your first stop on foot across the capital of Slovakia should be the Old Town. Its small streets are lined with charming churches, stores, and cafes, while colorful baroque structures and outdoor dining establishments line the main square.

A newer travel destination in central Europe, Bratislava still exudes an authentic, Old World vibe. For the time being, the costs are quite affordable so it’s still one of the cheapest cities to live in Europe.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Bratislava is estimated to cost 8 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 45 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Bratislava’s city center is at 4,673 euros, while that outside of the area is at 3,403 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 637.5 euros and 490 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Bratislava for one person can hit 668 euros on average, while it can cost about 2,285 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Dresden, Germany

Majority of cities in Germany aren’t really affordable, especially when we consider places like Bavaria. Berlin is reasonably priced for a capital city, though it still has a long way to go before it approaches the costs in eastern and southern Europe. At least one significant German city, Dresden, has affordable pricing and a wealth of amenities.

Dresden is renowned for its traditional architecture, top-notch museums and art galleries, and picturesque location along the Elbe River. Nature and culture abound in Dresden. The numerous baroque structures and palaces are a stunning display of art and architecture.

At the river bank below, you’ll discover some of Dresden’s beautiful gardens, parks, and forests. If you take a steamboat down the river, you can check out Saxon Switzerland, a hilly national park peppered with hundreds of climbing peaks.

Some of Dresden’s lovely gardens, parks, and forests can be found at the riverbank. A steep national park with hundreds of climbing peaks is called Saxon Switzerland, and it may be seen if you take a steamboat down the river.

When winter arrives, Dresden is adorned with its merry Christmas markets, which are renowned as some of the greatest in all of Germany.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Dresden is estimated to cost 10 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 45 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Dresden’s city center is at 4,170 euros, while that outside of the area is at 3,150 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 522.5 euros and 436 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Dresden for one person can hit 763 euros on average, while it can cost about 2,603 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Split, Croatia

Split is a stunning and genuine city that remains surrounded by its former regal walls. These walls are now crammed with a wide variety of businesses, eateries, residences, and hotels.

Meanwhile, you’ll feel as though you’ve traveled back in time when you visit Diocletian’s Palace, which is an amazingly well-preserved structure full of life, charisma, and mystery.

Split is home to the Riva, a waterfront promenade that is one of the most recognizable vistas in town, as well as to the oldest fish market in Europe, where you can sample regional specialties like sting rays, squid, and mussels.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Split is estimated to cost 60 Croatian kune while a mid-range restaurant can charge 300 kune for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Split’s city center is at 26,176 kune, while that outside of the area is at 20,608 kune. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 3,462 kune and 2,593 kune on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Split for one person can hit 4,391 kune on average, while it can cost about 15,567 kune for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Tallinn, Estonia

Another amazing city in Europe that is very reasonably priced is Tallinn. Despite being small, this city in the Baltics is mighty due to its rich culture and history. Over the ages, Tallinn was inhabited by a variety of foreign forces, giving the city its current multicultural vibe. Tallinn is sometimes referred to be the Silicon Valley of Europe due to its low costs and significant variety.

Tallinn’s walled city is remarkably active and well-preserved. Your Euros will go a long way in Tallinn, whether you only intend to visit for a short period while sailing the Baltic Sea or decide to stay for the long term and explore the city’s hidden gems.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Tallinn is estimated to cost 12 euros while a mid-range restaurant can charge 54 euros for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Tallinn’s city center is at 3,769 euros, while that outside of the area is at 2,680 euros. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 671 euros and 478 euros on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Tallinn for one person can hit 813 euros on average, while it can cost about 2,700 euros for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Bucharest, Romania

Bucharest is perhaps the least expensive place on this list, yet it has a lot to offer. A somber picture of the city’s recent history is painted by the communist-era structures that line many of its streets. The most conspicuous reminder of this is the Palace of Parliament, which is the second-largest structure on earth after the Pentagon.

The Dimitrie Gusti National Village Museum, King Michael I Park, and the Romanian Athenaeum are some of the city’s other notable attractions. You can also go to the Old Town for medieval relics as well as the best eateries and bars in the city.

In general, the city is dotted with what appears to be hundreds of beer gardens or other outdoor drinking areas.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Bucharest is estimated to cost 40 Romanian Lei (US$8.23) while a mid-range restaurant can charge 200 lei for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Bucharest’s city center is at 11,377 lei, while that outside of the area is at 7,147 lei. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 2,186 lei and 1,565 lei on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Bucharest for one person can hit 2,690 lei on average, while it can cost about 9,465 lei for a family of four, both excluding rent.

Cheapest Cities to Live in Europe: Prague, Czech Republic

The lively, culturally diverse city of Prague, which serves as the capital of the Czech Republic, is located in central Europe. The Old Town Square serves as the city’s most recognizable feature. You can find numerous baroque structures, vibrant churches, and the oldest astronomical clock in this area.

In Prague, a special aura dangles in the air that makes you feel like time has stood still for a thousand years. Experiencing this radiant and mystical city will not drive up your credit card bill, either.

Being in Prague is akin to staying in a place where time shas topped due to its unique aura. It won’t hurt your finances either to be in this dazzling and ethereal city.

Cost of Living

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Prague is estimated to cost 200 koruny while a mid-range restaurant can charge 950 koruny for a three-course meal for two, according to Numbeo.

In terms of real estate, the cost per square meter for buying an apartment within Prague’s city center is at 180,348 koruny, while that outside of the area is at 117,754 koruny. Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside and outside the city center cost 21,920 koruny and 15,785 koruny on average per month, respectively.

The overall monthly cost of living in Prague for one person can hit 16,926 koruny on average, while it can cost about 57,068 koruny for a family of four, both excluding rent.

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