Best Places to Live in Finland in 2022

Best Places to Live in Finland in 2022

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Introduction

Are you searching for the best places to live in Finland? There are a wide array of options you can pick from whether you want exquisite nature or cultural centers in this country, which was named in 2022 as the happiest country in the world based on the 2021 Happiness Score from the World Happiness Report.

Finland is a fantastic combination of amazing scenery and a unique sense of design, so even though it may not be your first choice, it is indeed a very cool option.

Do note though that living in the happiest country in the world comes at a high cost, so trying to decide exactly where you can settle down may prove to be quite challenging for a while.

Below is a list of the Finland’s coolest and most affordable neighborhoods so you can pick the area that’s most perfect for you (and your budget).

Best Places to Live in Finland: Helsinki

Helsinki, Finland’s capital, is the hub of activity despite being on the country’s southern shore. Helsinki is also the largest metropolis in the nation and is home to an unusual fusion of Pop Art, Modernism, Scandinavian, and minimalist architecture with some utilitarian elements.

This city can truly pique your interest. The most chic neighborhood in Helsinki to reside in has to be Kallio. For the cool kids in town, this is the place to be because it’s not only more relaxed than the city center, but also less expensive.

Being close to nightlife, coffee shops, flea markets, and public transportation is a benefit to living here. Vallila, a historically working-class neighborhood, is quickly transforming into a young neighborhood as well.

A unique sight in the center of a modern metropolis is to observe citizens buying fresh fish from shops selling reindeer hides and a range of handmade goods in Helsinki’s Old Town, close to the port region.

Visit the Helsinki City Museum right away if you want to find out more about the city. The Helsinki University Botanical Gardens are open for strolling during the summer.

A fantastic collection of uniquely Finnish galleries, studios, and boutiques can be found in the Design District, which is a haven for design enthusiasts and compulsive shoppers.

Cost of Living in Helsinki

Living in Helsinki would in general cost you less than if you would live in New York. For comparison, Numbeo estimated that you must have about $4,318.8 in the Finnish capital (as of the time of writing) so as to maintain the same standard of life that you can have with $9,200 in New York. These figures assume that you are renting in both cities.

Asset management firm Mercer also listed Helsinki as the 43rd most expensive city in the world for expats in its 2022 Cost of Living City Ranking. That’s way lower than New York which took the 7th spot, Hong Kong which ranked at the top spot, and fellow European city Zurich at number two.

Renting a one-bedroom apartment within Helsinki’s city center costs 1,018 euros per month and 802.6 euros outside that area. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach 8,585 euros and about 4,505.5 euros per square meter, respectively.

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Helsinki is estimated to cost 13 euros, while a mid-range restaurant can charge 80 euros for a three-course meal for two.

The overall cost of living in the city for a family of four can reach an estimated average of about 3,230.8 euros per month, while a single person can live off roughly 878 euros a month, both excluding rent. 

Upsides of living in Helsinki

  • The architecture is beautiful
  • There are so many co-working places
  • Dependable transportation

Downsides of living in Helsinki

  • Extremely pricey
  • Some people could find it unattractive
  • Perhaps you don’t like living in a major city

Best Places to Live in Finland: Rovaniemi

Even farther north than the comparatively large city of Oulu, Rovaniemi has the highest concentration of people close to the Arctic Circle.              

Remarkably, Rovaniemi has a vibrant cultural scene. It has a chamber orchestra of its own as well as a backdrop that will truly take your breath away in the winter.

Even though Rovaniemi is a small town, there are a few decent neighborhoods where you can settle in.

The decent residential neighborhood of Ratantaus is close enough to the city center to be accessible on foot, but could feel far enough away to serve like a tranquil retreat.

You can visit Santa Claus in this location then take in the amazing culture at the Rovaniemi Art Museum, which is a beautiful structural masterpiece and the northernmost regional art museum in all of Europe. The Pilke Science Centre is another place where you may learn everything there is to know about sustainable living and the frozen, forested nature that surrounds Rovaniemi.

Additionally, given how long winter lasts, you’ll have the opportunity to try out some winter sports. Ounasvaara, a neighboring resort, is the ideal location to get started.

Cost of Living in Rovaniemi

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Rovaniemi is estimated to cost about 12 euros, while a three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant can cost 80 euros, according to Numbeo.

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside Rovaniemi’s city center costs about 607 euros on average per month, while those outside that area costs roughly 550 euros. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach 2,250 euros and 1,150 euros per square meter, respectively.

Upsides of living in Rovaniemi

  • If you enjoy winter sports, this is ideal
  • Unique culture and café setting

Downsides of living in Rovaniemi             

  • Winters are very, very lengthy
  • Christmas can seem excessive to some
  • Far away from everything (a matter of preference)
Best Places to Live in Finland rovaniemi
Reindeer sleds in Rovaniemi. ©Planetware

Best Places to Live in Finland: Oulu

Oulu is undoubtedly a fascinating place to live. The city, which was founded in 1605, is a remarkably huge European city thanks to its abundance of historical structures and neoclassical construction.

Raksila, to the west of the city center, is a pleasant residential neighborhood with a mix of classic wooden townhouses and high-rise edifice for those looking for a place to call home in this northern outpost. On the other hand, Pikisaari is a historic area currently recognized as a gathering spot for artists.

The pedestrian friendly zone of the city, which is the best location for shopping and entertainment, is located in the Rotuaari neighborhood.

By installing a heating system below the surface in 2012, the city executed a brilliant plan to prevent the region from freezing during the winter.

The Air Guitar World Championships, which usually take place in August, are held in Oulu. This festival is equally odd and beautiful.

The Northern Ostrobothnia Museum, which examines the culture of this far northern region, is one of the city’s many museums where you can dig information and learn about the area.

Cost of Living in Oulu

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Oulu is estimated to cost about 12 euros, while a three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant can cost 62 euros, according to Numbeo.

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside Oulu’s city center costs about 640 euros on average per month, while those outside that area costs roughly 495 euros. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach 3,519.6 euros and 2,049 euros per square meter, respectively.

The overall cost of living in the city for a family of four can reach an estimated average of about 3,038 euros per month, while a single person can live off roughly 826 euros a month, both excluding rent. 

Upsides of living in Oulu

  • Living in a distinctive location
  • Rich culture and history to explore
  • A beautiful city

Downsides of living in Oulu

  • One may experience a strong sense of isolation from everything
  • There isn’t a lot to do
  • Winters can be extremely harsh

Best Places to Live in Finland: Espoo

Espoo is essentially a less expensive alternative to living in the center of Helsinki because it is practically on the border of the city and is actually a part of the Finnish capital itself.

However, this town still has a lot going for it, including a good number of museums, attractions, and other amenities that make life here enjoyable.

In addition to being a suitable region close to the center of town, Kauklahti is a nice spot for expats to establish themselves in Espoo. Another decent neighborhood in Espoo is Kauniainen, which has its own tiny commercial district.

If you enjoy architecture, the Tapiola neighborhood is a great area to explore. There are several unique buildings that date back to the 1950s, including the WeeGee Exhibition Centre, a marvel of modern concrete. Visit the Espoo Museum of Modern Art for further artistic endeavors.

The Nuuksio National Park and Water Sports Center Laguuni are both close, and old manors like Espoon Kartano, which were once private residences, are now open to the public for excursions. This Helsinki neighborhood also has other places where you may enjoy nature and history.

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Espoo is estimated to cost about 15 euros, while a three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant can cost 100 euros, according to Numbeo.

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside Espoo’s city center costs about 1,103 euros on average per month, while those outside that area costs roughly 828.7 euros. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach roughly 6,841 euros and 4,091 euros per square meter, respectively.

The overall cost of living in the city for a family of four can reach an estimated average of about 3,573 euros per month, while a single person can live off roughly 964 euros a month, both excluding rent. 

Upsides of living in Espoo

  • Helsinki minus the hefty cost
  • Stylish architecture
  • Excellent network

Downsides of living in Espoo

  • Might be too quiet
  • The social scene isn’t very active
  • There are not enough eateries and bars

Best Places to Live in Finland: Turku

Turku is the oldest city in Finland and served as the nation’s first capital before Helsinki was chosen as the new location. The city located in southwest Finland has so much to offer as it has a long history of serving as Finland’s most significant city.

Martti, the smallest and most heavily populated area in the city, can be a great option for you. It is close to the Aura River but still not distant from the center.

While expensive, Hirvensalo is regarded as a relatively hip, upscale part of town and is located further out from Turku’s center area.

There’s a lot to explore and study in Turku. Among others, there’s the magnificent 726-year-old Turku Cathedral, the opulent City Hall, the unpretentious open-air Luostarinmäki Museum, the oldest wooden house in Turku called Qwensel House, the odd but magnificent Turku Museum of Art, as well as the largest medieval structure in Finland — the Turku Castle.

The apparent adherence to tradition in Turku is one of its best aspects. During the holiday season, everyone is encouraged to act in a charitable manner.

Cost of Living in Turku

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Turku is estimated to cost about 12.50 euros, while a three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant can cost 100 euros, according to Numbeo.

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside Turku’s city center costs about 679 euros on average per month, while those outside that area costs roughly 556 euros. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach 4,083 euros and 2,033 euros per square meter, respectively.

The overall cost of living in the city for a family of four can reach an estimated average of 3,201 euros per month, while a single person can live off 883 euros a month, both excluding rent. 

Upsides of living in Turku

  • A lot of historical context
  • The summer is great with riverboats.
  • Hip bars, cafes, and eateries

Downsides of living in Turku

  • Several dreadful apartment buildings
  • Some people may find city living to be too much
  • Could have a hard time blending in
Best Places to Live in Finland turku
Turku, Finland. ©BudgetYourTrip

Best Places to Live in Finland: Tampere

The second biggest inland city in any of the Nordic nations, Tampere is situated in the Pirkanmaa region of southern Finland.

Tampere is a practical location to base yourself because it allows you to reach Helsinki in just one and a half hours by the high-speed rail service called Pendolino.

Although Tampere’s Hervanta neighborhood isn’t the most attractive, it is becoming a more pleasant and safer place to live in thanks to certain affordable housing alternatives and modern constructions. On the other hand, Pyynikki, west of the city center, is a lush region with a natural park and beach if you’re looking for a somewhat more expensive but far lovelier location.

Tampere is a city rich in culture and has a bustling culinary scene, where the mustamakkara (blood sausage) is a specialty. There are a lot of attractions in the city like the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra. There are a few noteworthy sights in Tampere as well. The city’s church is a fascinating structure with some highly unconventional paintings inside.

Cost of Living in Tampere

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Tampere is estimated to cost 12.50 euros, while a three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant can cost 80 euros, according to Numbeo.

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside Tampere’s city center costs about 763 euros on average per month, while those outside that area costs roughly 577 euros. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach 4,220 euros and 3,177.5 euros per square meter, respectively.

The overall cost of living in the city for a family of four can reach an estimated average of 2,829 euros per month, while a single person can live off 764.5 euros a month, both excluding rent. 

Upsides of living in Tampere

  • lovely small-town vibe
  • It’s simple to access nature
  • Lots of things to do

Downsides of living in Tampere

  • More expensive than certain Finnish cities
  • Winters can be exceedingly chilly
  • Some may find it too small

Best Places to Live in Finland: Jyväskylä

The city of Jyväskylä is situated in the western region of Finnish Lakeland and is renowned for both its excellent educational system and its stunning natural surroundings. Despite its icy winters, Jyväskylä transforms into a true paradise in the summer since there are almost no sunsets.

If you appreciate having access to amenities right outside your door and being linked to the outside world, establishing your base in the city’s Downtown area is a smart idea.

There aren’t a ton of things to do in Jyväskylä, but it does have a few surprises for your enjoyment. There is also the Alvar Aalto Museum for all things architecture and design for all lovers of aesthetics, as well as cool places to learn about all things clever and Finnish, and how this region has been formed.

If you want to experience additional beauty, go skiing in the mountains while it’s still snowy, or be ready to go rowing on a neighboring lake in the summer.

Cost of Living in Jyväskylä

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Jyväskylä is estimated to cost about 10 euros, while a three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant can cost 71.50 euros, according to Numbeo.

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside Jyväskylä’s city center costs about 680 euros on average per month, while those outside that area costs roughly 526 euros. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach 2,700 euros and 2,100 dollars per square meter, respectively.

The overall cost of living in the city for a family of four can reach an estimated average of 2,880 euros per month, while a single person can live off 784 euros a month, both excluding rent. 

Upsides of living in Jyväskylä

  • Lovely nature
  • Tranquil place
  • Beautiful summers

Downsides of living in Jyväskylä

  • Not very dynamic
  • Can seem too isolated
  • Winter is characterized by little daylight hours, chilly temperatures, and massive amounts of snow

Best Places to Live in Finland: Vantaa

Vantaa is a less expensive alternative to Helsinki because the Finnish capital is only a short distance away to the south and has an airport that is practically next door.

But Vantaa stands on its own as a city, complete with a variety of eateries, as well as a few hip bars and restaurants. The region offers a wide variety of dining options, and as Vantaa’s train station is just in the midst of it, journeys to Helsinki are convenient.

We suggest picking Tikkurila, which is located in the town’s center, as your home base whilst in Vantaa.

A planetarium and an attractive old building that serves as a museum are both situated in Vantaa’s Tikkuria district. Additionally, there are many stores in this area, such as at Martintorni.

Cost of Living in Vantaa

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Vantaa is estimated to cost about 13 euros, while a three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant can cost 80 euros, according to Numbeo.

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside Vantaa’s city center costs about 925 euros on average per month, while those outside that area costs 808.5 euros. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach 4,250 euros and 3,360 euros per square meter, respectively.

Upsides of living in Vantaa

  • Helsinki is nearby
  • Lovely town
  • There are many good restaurants to visit

Downsides of living in Vantaa

  • There is not a lot to do
  • Some portions of the city look worn-out

Best Places to Live in Finland: Savonlinna

Savonlinna is a charming area where you can reside in as it is located in the center of Finland’s southeast lake district, close to Saimaa, the nation’s largest freshwater lake. When summertime comes around, you will have easy access to glistening waters and breathtaking natural beauty.

Savonlinna is a small city, but there are a few neighborhoods to select from when looking for a place to call home. You could choose to set up residence close to the Savonlinna train station, in the Suvisranta neighborhood, or for something incredibly lovely, you could search for a location by the water in the Miekkoniemi neighborhood.

Savonlinna is an island city where residents have unlimited access to nature. In addition to the nearby Linnansaari National Park, there is the neighboring Kolovesi National Park to explore, with its spectacular and rocky shoreline. It’s definitely a water lover’s paradise and there are numerous islands to discover.

Along with the ancient splendor of Olavinlinna Castle, this location is rich in history and culture. In the summer, the Savonlinna Opera Festival is held here, creating a magnificent evening of music and the midnight sun.

Upsides of living in Savonlinna

  • A lovely spot to call home
  • Several outdoor activities are available
  • Affordable in comparison to other places

Downsides of living in Savonlinna

  • Might get dull
  • The winter is really gloomy
Best Places to Live in Finland rauma
Rauma, Finland. ©Isabel Goncalves

Best Places to Live in Finland: Rauma

On the west coast of Finland is a tiny village called Rauma. Despite being small, it might be one of the most endearing villages in the entire nation.

For starters, it has the largest wooden old town in the Nordic region that has been certified by UNESCO and whose cobblestoned lanes are lined with rows of pastel-colored cottages with tasteful adornment.

The Tarvonsaari neighborhood, which is sort of halfway between the Old Town and Rauma Las train station and has a ton of restaurants and other services nearby, is one of the greatest spots to locate a home to live in Rauma. Aside from that, living close to the Old Town’s center means having gorgeous streets just outside your door.

Return to Rauma’s wooden old town, a living museum, where you’ll find a wealth of attractions to discover, including charming boutiques with world-famous lacework to admire and cozy eateries where you can eat regional cuisine. However, the history of Rauma stretches much further back than only the history of wooden structures.

Cost of Living in Rauma

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant in Rauma is estimated to cost about 12 euros, while a three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant can cost 60 euros, according to Numbeo.

Rent for one-bedroom apartments inside Rauma’s city center costs about 750 euros on average per month, while those outside that area costs roughly 500 euros. The costs for buying apartment within and outside the city center can reach 2,500 euros and 1,500 euros per square meter, respectively.

Upsides of living in Rauma

  • Old town is quite attractive
  • Peaceful living near the sea
  • There is a lot of history to learn

Downsides of living in Rauma

  • It could seem lonely
  • There isn’t much going on at all
  • There are no co-working facilities

Best Places to Live in Finland: Safety

Living in Finland is rather safe, albeit nature has a tendency to be quite perilous. The winters are extremely cold, with temperatures frequently falling considerably below zero. And such winters are colder and darker the more you head north.

The overall crime rate in the nation is rather low. Urban hubs like Helsinki and other sizable cities are the apparent locations where crimes usually occur, but you should be okay as long as you stay mindful of your surroundings. Note that there’s no place in the world that can guarantee your safety a hundred percent. It won’t hurt to always exercise caution, though.

Best Places to Live in Finland: Final Thoughts

Finland is generally cited as one of the greatest nations to live in and retire to, especially for those seeking a secure and relaxing location to do so. Here, you’ll feel most at home if you like to spend time in unspoiled environment. The harsh winters and expensive expense of living, however, may compel the most frugal retiree to stay away. Depending on your unique situation, you should decide if you want to live the rest of your life in this refuge of knowledge and the midnight sun.

Are you into investments? If so, you can read our articles such as best investment options for Australian expats in 2021, what are the best investment options for Canadian expats in 2021, what are the best investment options for UK expats in 2022, and how to invest in the S&P 500 from outside America.

We also have reviews of Investors Trust Access Portfolio, Novia Global, Dominion Capital Strategies Guernsey, Custodian Life, St James Place fund, Sarwa Dubai, HSBC Expat, Ardan International, and Investors Trust S&P 500 Review.

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